We recently had the opportunity to talk to Nacho Molero, freelance and soon to have a masters in Interior Design, and aspiring photographer. During the interview, Molero gave us an insider’s view of what it’s like to be an interior designer and photography. He also shed some light on the magic of it all.

Here’s a transcript of our conversation (edited for clarity):

Me: So why don’t you go ahead and tell me what about interior design and photography appeal to you?

Molero: So, I recently moved to Barcelona because I am doing a master’s program to specialize in interior design. I’ve always been extremely interested in interior design, and I like to think my interests started with architecture.

Most of my Instagram really is architecture. I find that when I walk around the cities I am not able to avoid taking photos after photos of just facade and coldness and beautiful places. 

Interior design has always been sort of on the sidelines and as the years went by, I sort of realized that this is absurd. I mean, clearly I really, really love doing this and everything related to this. Everything.

Especially regarding interior design, I mean it is literally where you live and everything that you feel when you are home. And I’m feeling truly calm and at peace and I’m surrounded by things that you really love. I’m not confused, you know.

I remember, when I lived by myself in Madrid, I had a chance to put my place up really nicely. I remembered that once I finished, I experienced peace, tranquility, and the general positive vibes. Interior design has really been this sort of obsession with the things that I’ve always really loved.

Me: Wonderful. What are some tools and applications you use to get by with your creative works?

Molero: I would say two things are very, very useful. One thing is to find and download a 3D design program. They have become very unique and being able to create the space and see it in 3D before you buy anything really helps so much because you may have an idea.

One thing that I myself have to come to terms with is that I may be good at some things regarding design, but I’m quite terrible at others, such as color matching. So, when it comes to color matching the tools I rely on are libraries, color systems, and things that I can find a line that I know for a fact work.

Design is not just creating from scratch. It’s also sufficiently having an educated eye to identify works and replications. 

Me: How neat. My last question for you is what would you recommend to someone starting out in your profession?

Molero: the first thing you should say to anyone that wants to pursue a creative career, is to consume as much of it as you can.

If you want to become a writer, go read; wish to become a photographer, watch movies and all the exhibitions. If you aspire to become a painter, go to a museum and educate your eyes. Most importantly have a passion for it. More than anything.

That’s the sort of thing you first have to taste to truly be sure that either you love it [design,] or just love to look at beautiful pictures. Which are two different things.

To see Mr. Molero’s portfolio, check out his twitter and Instagram

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